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Moving Your Life to Australia? Prohibited Things You Can’t Ship with You

By ElizabethLee
17 March, 2017


Australia has a lot of strict rules and regulations about what can and cannot be brought into the country. Although you may consider some things to be purely harmless, the quarantine and inspection service may think otherwise. Before you start packing up, make sure you can actually take your things with you. Some of them may require special permits to enter the country, other belongings you’ll need to leave behind and repurchase once you arrive.

 

 

1. Ceramic Dishes

Any glazed ceramic dishes can be stopped by Australian customs. This is because some glazes are made with lead or cadmium. You aren’t allowed to bring anything ceramic that’s made for eating or drinking into the country unless the lead and cadmium levels have been tested and deemed safe. This could be a headache – especially if you already know your dishes are safe. You can either have them tested and approved, or leave them behind and buy new ones when you arrive. If the dishes are precious to you, importing them can be complicated.

 

 

2. Certain Medications or Supplements

Some antibiotics, prescription drugs, and nutritional supplements cannot enter the country without special permission. If you bring these things on the plane with you, you won’t have to obtain special permits as long as you have proof of prescription. If you don’t intend on bringing them on the flight, you can still have them shipped with a proper permit. Once approved, they can be sent overnight by air so you won’t have to go too long without them.

 

 

3. Anything That May Be Dirty

This might seem strange, but Australia staunchly protects its environment. Outdoor items like patio furniture or camping gear must go through quarantine if they’re visibly dirty. Australia doesn’t want invasive species, such as insects, plant blights, or fungus to inadvertently be introduced to the country. Make sure you’ve scrubbed outdoor items until they’re sparkling clean if you want to be allowed to have them.

 

 

4. Plants or Seeds

Unfortunately, you won’t be bringing any plants from or seeds from home. Starting a garden in Australia, you’ll have to buy all plants, seeds, and bulbs locally. You also cannot bring any pesticides or gardening materials. Anything that could be considered a poison or a live biological material can’t be brought into the country. Most of these items will probably be fine, however, Australia is very concerned with plants that don’t belong in the environment. You’re best off attending a local farmers market and obtaining the seeds and bulbs from area native gardeners. It will help you meet new people, and you’ll know for sure that the things you plant will thrive in the environment.

 

 

Shipping Things Out of Australia

Shipping things out of Australia can also be tricky. Sending local boutique wines, coffees, or crafts from Australia back to your family can sometimes be difficult. If your country allows the import of these goods, you’re going to need a reliable way to get them safely to their destination. Australian shipping companies like Pack & Send will help you ship souvenirs and thoughtful gifts to your friends and family.

 

 

 

Moving things back and forth across the world is never easy, but it’s much less easy when you aren’t sure what you’re getting yourself into. If you ever have questions about something you want to ship into the country, check with the official regulations just to be on the safe side.  

 

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