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Visas and Passports in Malta

Author: Jim Newham
Submitted: November 2013

Malta is part of the European Economic Area (EEA), within which free movement and labour are permitted. The EEA includes all the European Union countries – currently excepting new member Croatia – and three European Free Trade Association (EFTA) members: Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein. The fourth EFTA member, Switzerland, has the same agreements. EEA and Swiss citizens can enter Malta with minimal restrictions.

Citizens of Britain, Ireland, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus and Romania only need either a passport or a national ID card to enter Malta. These countries are outside the Schengen area, which comprises all the EU states not mentioned above and the EFTA countries. Within the Schengen area it is even easier to cross borders. Technically, to enter Malta from within the Schengen area you do not need any official documents. Nevertheless you should always take either your passport or national ID card with you for when you need to prove your identity, such as at airport check-in and if you are stopped by the police.

To enter Malta from outside the EEA, you will always need a valid passport, or an equivalent travel document if you are a stateless person or refugee. Passports and other travel documents must be valid for three months longer than the period of your stay. In addition to a valid passport, you may need a visa to immigrate into Malta.

No Visa Required

As suggested above, you do not need a visa to enter Malta if you are an EEA or Swiss citizen; you are free to stay there indefinitely. Commonwealth citizens and citizens of several other countries that have treaties with the EU, such as Japan and the USA, may also enter Malta without a visa. However, if you are from one of these countries, you will only be permitted to stay in Malta without a visa for 90 days. 

Visa Types

Leaving aside short-stay visas, there is only one type of long-stay visa issued by the Maltese authorities, the Type D or national visa. This visa is for stays that are longer than 90 days. It lasts for a year after which point it needs to be renewed. Most non-Maltese people will also need an employment licence to work in Malta. See the ‘Working in Malta’ subsection for more details.

Visa Application

To apply for a visa, you will first need to visit the nearest Maltese embassy, consulate, or equivalent representation in person to obtain the correct application form. All visa application forms are available in English. Whichever visa you apply for, you will need the following documents:

  • Valid passport (with at least one blank page)
  • Two passport-sized photos
  • Payment of visa fee
  • Proof of the purpose of your visit

As it is a small country, Malta does not have representation in all the world’s countries. If you do not have a Maltese embassy or consulate in your country, diplomatic representation can generally be found at the French, Italian, Austrian or German Embassy. For a full list of countries giving details of where to apply for a visa, see this webpage.

Alternatively, you can contact the Maltese mission that is closest to you. Visa application takes a minimum of four weeks.

 

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